What was the need to destroy so many lives and resources in Afghanistan?

 

What was the need to destroy so many lives and resources in Afghanistan?



A peace deal between the United States and the Taliban calls for the withdrawal of all US troops from Afghanistan within 14 months. Accordingly, the current month of April is the 14th month. 

Although he could not withdraw, US President Joe Biden announced on April 15 that US troops would be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan by September 11.

 There were some conditions in the implementation of the agreement made on February 29, 2020.

 According to the agreement, the withdrawal will depend on the future conduct of the Taliban, the reduction of violence in Afghanistan and successful negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan government.


President Joe Biden has officially announced the end of America's longest war in Afghanistan, saying it is time to end America's longest war. The time has come to bring the troops back home.

 The immediate priority now is to address the immediate challenges of the United States rather than to fight the Taliban. "I am talking about the US military presence in Afghanistan as the fourth president," he said. I do not want to leave the issue to any of my successors. "

But has sustainable stability returned to the country at all? For two decades, all parties have had to pay a high price for the US coalition's position in Afghanistan. 

That price has to be paid with life, loss of life and money. The BBC has been trying to find out whether there was any need for so many casualties and loss of resources during this long period.

Let's look back a little. In the five years from 1996 to 2001, the international terrorist organization Al-Qaeda has established a strong base in Afghanistan under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. 

They have set up militant training camps there. Even they have had the opportunity to test the effects of toxic gases on dogs. They have recruited more than 20,000 people from different parts of the world and trained each of them to become militants.

 Al-Qaeda attacked the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998, three years after its inception. Those attacks killed 224 people, most of them civilians in Africa.



At the time, al-Qaeda had the full support of the Taliban government in Afghanistan. In 1996, the Taliban seized power in Afghanistan. The United States then sought to oust al-Qaeda from Afghanistan by pressuring the Taliban government through its ally Saudi Arabia. 

What was the need to destroy so many lives and resources in Afghanistan?


But the Taliban government did not respond. But after the horrific terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001, the international community called on the Taliban government to hand over those who are responsible. But they didn't respond to the call. As a result, US-led forces launched an operation in Afghanistan.

More than 2,300 US troops have been killed fighting in Afghanistan. More than 20,000 were injured. In addition, more than 450 British soldiers were killed and more than 100 were killed of other countries.


In the months that followed, the Northern Alliance, an anti-Taliban force in Afghanistan, attacked Kabul with the help of US and British forces, overthrowing the Taliban government. Al-Qaeda militants fled across the border into Pakistan.

20 years of loss

More than 2,300 US troops have been killed fighting in Afghanistan. More than 20,000 were injured. In addition, more than 450 British soldiers were killed and more than 100 were killed of other countries.

 On the other hand, more than 60,000 Afghan soldiers have been killed during this long period. The civilian death toll is almost double of that.

And the expenditure of the war was limitless. U.S. taxpayers have had to spend nearly a trillion US dollars to wage war in Afghanistan.


What was the need to destroy so many lives and resources in Afghanistan?

Hope and apprehension

A senior U.S. security official told the BBC that since then (the beginning of the US led operation) no other plans for international militant attacks from Afghanistan have succeeded. 

In that case, the presence of Western troops and security forces in the country as part of international counter-terrorism measures has succeeded in achieving their goals.

But despite all this, peace has yet come to the country. According to the research team Action on Armed Violence, more people were killed in explosions in Afghanistan in 2020 than in any other country in the world. None of Al Qaeda, Islamic State (IS) or other militant groups have been completely wiped out.

If the Western forces are completely removed from here, these militant groups will rise again.

General Sir Nick Carter, the UK's chief defense officer who has visited Afghanistan at various times, said: The country is now in a better position than it was in 2001. 

And the Taliban are now more liberal than ever. "The international community has created a civil society in Afghanistan that has changed the way the Taliban seek legitimacy based on its popularity. 


However, the London-based Asia Pacific Foundation's director of international security, Goel told that, many are disappointed with the decision to withdraw the army. 

"There's a real concern now," he said. Afghanistan could once again become a hotbed of extremism, as it was in the 1990s. Various Western intelligence agencies have expressed similar concerns.

Concerned about the future, Goel said foreign terrorists would now flock to Afghanistan from the West to receive terrorist training. But the West can't do anything about it, because in the meantime they will end the process of leaving Afghanistan. "

In 2003, the BBC's Phil Gulwin expressed doubts about the future of the US-led coalition in Afghanistan. He said that in 20 years, the Taliban would regain control of most of the south.

But perhaps this is not the inevitable consequence of Afghanistan. Rather, the future of the country depends on two factors.
 
What was the need to destroy so many lives and resources in Afghanistan?


First, will the Taliban allow al-Qaeda and IS militants to be active in Afghanistan and occupy territory if they return to power?


Second, the extent to which the international community has agreed to maintain control there, even if they would not be in Afghanistan. Is it really possible?


Now that the Taliban has a role to play in Afghan politics, if they are allowed to come to power at last, does the destruction of so many lives, blood, money and infrastructure mean anything at all?




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