What will happen after Trump's impeachment?

 US President Donald Trump has been indicted for the second time. This is the first time in the country's history that a president has been impeached twice, in one term and just seven days before Trump's term expires. 

Like Trump's tenure and countless unprecedented events, this one is unprecedented. The House of Representatives has indicted him for inciting an attack on Congress on January 6. 

He is accused of inciting violence against the U.S. government, threatening the integrity of the democratic system, interfering in the peaceful transfer of power, and endangering a section of the government. 

In the House of Representatives on Tuesday, 222 Democrats and 10 Republicans voted in favor of the proposal; The impeachment motion was passed with the support of both the parties.


There was no alternative for the Democratic Party to take this impeachment very quickly. 

For, to uphold the rule of law, to establish that the president is not above the law; Destroying the fear of such behavior in the future could not have been so clear in any other way.

 The purpose of the trial is to send a message to those who were involved in the violence and to those who sympathized with them that such attempts at insurrection would be dealt with constitutionally and legally. 

Without such a move, Democrats and those who see the coup attempt as a threat to democracy would be exposed to moral weakness. But it is also true that there are political dangers to this move.

Procedurally, the proposal is now set to go to the Senate and be heard there, but the Senate is now on vacation and will reconvene on January 19. 

Republican Mitch McConnell, the leader of the outgoing Senate Majority Party, said the proposal would be considered after January 20.




 He argues that the country now needs to prioritize the new administration. It is clear that Mitch McConnell is not reluctant to sue, but he is not willing to be disliked by Trump supporters at the moment. 

On the other hand, Democrat Chuck Schumer, who will be the leader of the majority party after the 20th, has said that justice will be done today or tomorrow.

The trial will require the support of sixty six senators to convict Trump. It is thought that after Trump leaves power at the end of his term, many Republican senators will vote in favor of his trial and conviction. 

If he is convicted, he can be disqualified from politics and any government post by a majority vote of the Senate. 

Already, Mitch McConnell and several Republican senators are hinting that they want the party to be free of Trump's influence. 

As a result, there is no doubt that Trump's trial will be take place in the Senate in the future, even if his trial won't take place in the Senate right now.

Some suggest that the trial be held 100 days after the Biden administration took office. 

In the wake of the impeachment, Joe Biden called on the Senate to fulfill its "constitutional responsibility" and to approve members of his nominated cabinet. 

He does not want the Senate to be so busy with this trial that it is too late to get his cabinet approval.

After cabinet approval in the Senate and the new administration completing 100 days of work, those who oppose the trial argue that this will end the urgency of the issue; Trump and his supporters will be able to present it as a failure of the Democrats and all in all the issue will affect public opinion.

There are also fears of adverse political reactions to the impeachment. Part of the Republican Party is now trying to say that impeachment of Trump has paved the way for violence. 

President Trump's remarks in a speech in Texas on Tuesday that the impeachment would create more anger and violence are a signal to his supporters. Information about the January 6 attack shows that the attack has been planned for a long time. 

As a result, there is no reason to believe that the group will fall behind after a failed attempt on January 6. 

There is also evidence that the masterminds of the violent attacks had previously contacted members of Congress and were aware of the preparations for such rallies.

 The FBI is detaining people from across the country who appeared to be preparing to attack the Congress building, not to attend the rally.


There is also evidence that the masterminds of the violent attacks had previously contacted members of Congress and were aware of the preparations for such rallies.

 The FBI is detaining people from across the country who appeared to be preparing to attack the Congress building, not to attend the rally.


The FBI has already warned of possible attacks on parliament buildings in every state in the country. Security has been beefed up across the country ahead of Biden's swearing-in and on January 20 amid fears of further violence.

In addition to concerns about imminent violence, what the pro-Trump group will do in the future is also a big issue. 

Such violent groups have long evolved, but have not been noticed by detectives, have been organized to exploit the anger within society, and have been so influenced by their lies over the past few months that regaining their confidence in the system is now a major challenge. 

Distrust of the political system, the presence of violent organizations and toxic leadership such as Trump and the continued support of a large section of the Republican Party indicate a volatile situation in the days ahead.



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