New government in Yemen, how far is the peace process?

 


When the Saudi-led coalition launched airstrikes in Yemen in 2015 with the intention of ousting the Houthis and handing control of Sanaa over to President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi, the coalition may not have realized how futile and unsuccessful it was.

 Six years have passed and so far this alliance has not been able to add anything to the bag of success. Yemen has become a land of hellish destruction.

The United Nations said in a report on December 1 that 233,000 people had died in the war in Yemen so far.

The war in Yemen has devastated the country's numerous infrastructure, including mosques, hospitals, colleges and even weddings and funerals, according to media reports.

The country's health system collapsed during the civil war. There is a severe cholera epidemic in Yemen. 

In July 2016, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator said that more than 320,000 cases had been listed. He blamed the war on the epidemic and said international forces were supporting it on the battlefield. 

As of October 2017, the epidemic was described as the worst cholera outbreak in recorded history, affecting more than 8,00,000 people. The United Nations says 80 percent of the country's population needs emergency relief
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As of October 2017, the epidemic was described as the worst cholera outbreak in recorded history, affecting more than 8,00,000 people.

The United Nations says 80 percent of the country's population needs emergency relief.

When the wave of the Arab Spring spread to Yemen, the longtime ruler Ali Abdullah Saleh lost his throne. After that, Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi took charge as the President of the country. 

Amid the ongoing political stalemate, Iran-backed Shiite rebels seized the capital, Sanaa, in late 2014. President Mansour Hadi then fled to Saudi Arabia, declaring Aden its temporary capital.

 In early 2015, the Saudi-led coalition launched airstrikes to help President Mansour Hadi regain control of the capital, Sanaa, from the Houthis.

Although the north and south of Yemen were united in 1990, the country is divided into different groups and factions. Most of the country's Shia population lives in the north of the country. 

All groups became active in the political stalemate. Much of the north of the country fell to Houthi control, and the southern city of Aden was the scene of widespread clashes between the UAE-backed Southern Transitional Council and government forces. 

At the same time, the militant group IS and Al Qaeda emerged in the country. The state military forces have to deal with so many forces at the same time. 

The UAE has carried out airstrikes targeting Houthis on behalf of the Saudi-led coalition, as well as supporting the Southern Transitional Council, which is fighting against government forces. 

This incident created a distance between the two close allies in the Gulf.

President Abd Rabbuh Mansour Hadi has been in Saudi Arabia since 2014. Negotiations have been going on for a long time to resolve differences between the Saudi-backed Hadi government and the UAE-backed Southern Transitional Council. 

These two sides are simultaneously facing the same enemy- Houthis. After lengthy discussions, a new 24-member cabinet was formed with Moin Abdul Malik as prime minister on the 19th of last month.

 The new government ensured equal representation of 12 people from the north and south of the country.

With this new government, it was possible to end the differences with the Southern Transitional Council. It was announced that the new government would fight the Houthis unitedly.

 With this new government, it was possible to end the differences with the Southern Transitional Council. It was announced that the new government would fight the Houthis unitedly.

Now the question is, will this new government be able to establish peace in Yemen? On December 30, when the plane carrying the new government landed in the southern city of Aden, the whole area was shaken by a huge explosion.

This caused great loss of lives to civilians and their properties . The arrival of the new government at the airport and multiple such explosions carry considerable importance. 

The new government has already blamed Houthis for the attack, and the Saudi coalition has responded by launching multiple airstrikes in Sanaa that night.

Already there has been a shift in power in the White House, with Joe Biden set to take power very soon. 

Before he was elected president, in an interview with the Council of Foreign Relations, Joe Biden said if he came to power, he would cut off US aid to Yemen and mentioned it as a Saudi-led "catastrophic war".

 So very soon maybe Saudi Arabia will have to come under pressure for the war running in Yemen. In other words, Joe Biden has announced a return to the nuclear deal with Iran. Iran may become stronger if sanctions are lifted.

If they think that the Houthis can be defeated through fighting, then it must be said that the fool is living in heaven. 

Before implementing the new government's vow to oust the Houthis, they should consider the Saudi coalition's failed efforts over the past six years.




 The country's policymakers should urge the new government to sit at the negotiating table with the Houthis to resolve this long-term problem. Otherwise, like other countries of the Middle East, Yemen will have to burn in its own fire.

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